Husk cherries could be your new favorite produce

September 10, 2017

Last summer, I discovered husk cherries (also known as ground cherries) at my local farm stand. The farmer convinced me to buy a pint of them, and they've been my new favorite Northeast late-summer/early autumn produce ever since.

Husk cherries are in the same family as tomatillos. They have a paper-like husk on the outside and a small yellow-green berry on the inside. They taste like a cross between a cherry tomato and a grape, or a tomato and a pineapple. Yeah, I know, that's hard to imagine, but just trust me on this. They're delicious.

ShutterstockI've never been one to eat cherry tomatoes, or any tomatoes, right off the vine. But husk cherries are a different story. I eat a few each time I pass through the kitchen. Pop them out of their husks and right into your mouth. Mmm mmm good. Apparently they stay fresh inside their husks for at least a few weeks, but they've never been around long enough to test that in my kitchen.

It's incredibly easy to eat husk cherries plain, or add them to salads. But how about taking your husk cherry game to the next level? Check out these recipes and see what works for you. The end of your summer will never be the same again!

Husk Cherry Margarita from the Foodie Nurse

A simple spin on a traditionally delicious drink, try serving this at your next gathering. Sweet and tart and boozy all in one glass.

Ground Husk Cherry Pie from Healthfully Ever After

Why bring a traditional apple pie to your next gathering, when you could wow your crowd with a husk cherry pie? Unusual, yes, but just as delicious.

Fresh Ground Cherry Salsa from the Dig In

Homemade salsa is quick to make and so different from storebought; there's really no reason NOT to make your own. Customize your salsa with your favorite flavors — extra cilantro, pineapple, mango, tomatillo, or, in this case, husk cherry!

Ground Cherry Preserves from The Hip Girl's Guide to Homemaking

Making preserves is an involved process if you want to properly preserve the results for consumption months later. However, a little extra effort can be worth it, and this jam looks good enough to merit it.

 

Erin Fife